Carbon dating and turin

"We believe it is possible that neutron emissions by earthquakes could have induced the image formation on the Shroud's linen fibres, through thermal neutron capture on nitrogen nuclei, and could also have caused a wrong radiocarbon dating," hypothesizes Carpinteri. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission.The content is provided for information purposes only.The Shroud has attracted widespread interest ever since Secondo Pia took the first photograph of it in 1898: about whether it is Jesus' purported burial cloth, how old it might be, and how the image was created.According to radiocarbon dating done in 1988, the cloth was only 728 years old at the time.It has been venerated as such for centuries, and since the 17th century, when it came to Turin, has been the cathedral’s best-known treasures.Popes have come to gaze on the Shroud; Benedict XVI said when he visited in 2010 that “we see, as in a mirror, our suffering in the suffering of Christ”. They refer to the 1987 Carbon-14 dating and say, “It’s medieval. That settles it.” But the believers bounce back, and year by year, as modern technology advances, more and more evidence accumulates which causes anyone who reads the research to be sceptical of the sceptics.

As controls, three samples whose ages had been determined independently were also dated.This technology uses infra-red light and spectroscopy to measure the radiation intensity through wavelengths, and from these measurements a date can be calculated.Fanti’s method dated fibres from the Shroud to 300 BC–400 AD.One scientist proposes a new idea of how the mysterious Shroud could have been produced only to have another researcher argue that it was impossible.In 1987 the Shroud was subjected to carbon-14 dating technology which dated it to the 13th century.

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